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Japanese Cookery Class & Meal – Gyozas; Sushi; Pork Tonkatsu;

We hope you enjoyed your class with us, below are the recipes – if you have any questions for chef please do ask and we’ll get back to you as soon as possible.

we cooked: Miso Sweet Potato Gyoza’s; Uramaki Sushi; Amazu-an Glazed Pork; Stir-Fried Udon Noodles;

Sweet Potato Gyoza Recipe

Gyozas are really versatile, a crowd-pleaser and fundamentally tasty!  We love to use a blend of sweet potato and tofu – roast the sweet potatoes whole in their skins until squishy and mash.  But this recipe works just as well with meat – just switch out the sweet potato/ tofu and replace with chicken mince or similar.

Ingredients: Makes about 40

    • – 150g shredded cabbage (any softer white/green cabbage)
    • – 1/2 teaspoon salt
    • – 250g mashed sweet potato
    • – 140g firm tofu (or try smoked tofu), finely chopped
    • – 50g crispy onions or shallots
    • – 1/2 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
    • – 2 minced garlic cloves
    • – 1 tablespoon chopped spring onions
    • – 2 teaspoons white miso paste
    • – 1 teaspoon sesame oil
    • – 1/4 teaspoon caster sugar
    • – 40 gyoza wrappers (these are generally vegan, check pack for trace of dairy)

For cooking

  • – 4 teaspoons sesame oil
  • – 120ml cold water

For an alternative quick dipping sauce

  • – 6 tablespoons soy sauce
  • – 3 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • – A few drops of sesame or chilli oil

Method:

  1. Sprinkle the salt over the shredded chopped cabbage in a small bowl. Stir and leave it for 10 minutes. Squeeze the cabbage firmly to drain and discard the excess water. Transfer to a large deep bowl.
  2. In a bowl mix sweet potato, ginger, garlic, spring onion, miso paste, one teaspoon of sesame oil and sugar.
  3. Line a large tray with baking paper. Fill a small cup with cold water.
    Place a gyoza wrapper on a flat dry surface and put a heaped teaspoon of the sweet potato mixture in the centre
    Dip one finger in the cold water and trace a line along half the edge of the gyoza wrapper
    Fold the wrapper over to enclose the filling. Pinch the wrapper in the centre at the top to seal that spot.
    Holding the filled wrapper in your left hand (or right if left-handed), pleat the top of the wrapper. Set aside on the lined tray keeping the edge up. Repeat with the rest of the wrappers.
  4. For the cooking part, use a large frying pan or skillet with a tight-fitting lid.
    Put the pan over a medium heat and add one teaspoon of sesame oil. When it is hot, place the gyoza in the pan with their edge up. Cook for about 3 minutes or until the bottom of the gyoza is golden.
    Add in 60ml of cold water and cover immediately with the lid. Steam for about 2 minutes or until most of the water has evaporated.
    Uncover, let the water evaporate completely, then add one teaspoon of sesame oil. Cook until the gyoza is crispy in the bottom (when shaking the pan, the dumplings should slide; if not, set the pan aside and cover with the lid for another 2 or 3 minutes).
    The gyoza dumplings should be slightly translucent and the filling should be firm.
  5. Flip the gyoza dumplings on a large serving plate, browned surface up.
    Serve with the dipping sauce

Dumpling Dressing

Ingredients – Serves 2:

  • – 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • – 1 tablespoon of ponzu
  • – 1 teaspoon black vinegar
  • – 1 tablespoon water
  • – 1 tablespoon of honey
  • – pinch of black pepper and/or gochugaru (red chili pepper flakes)
  • – 1 clove of garlic, grated
  • – 1cm of fresh ginger, grated

Method:

  1. Mix all the ingredients in a bowl and refrigerate until needed.

Tuna Uramaki Sushi

Ingredients – Serves 4:

Although this dish has tuna in its title, if you don’t enjoy eating it raw, or don’t like the thought of it, don’t worry, you can substitute for a smoked fish like mackerel, or try extra avocado.

  • – 200g sushi rice uncooked (400g cooked, following cooking instructions)
  • – 4 sheets of nori
  • – Wasabi paste
  • – Pickled ginger
  • – Soy sauce
  • – Japanese mayo
  • – 1x avocado, sliced
  • – 1x carrot, shredded
  • – 1x cucumber, de-seeded, cut into long batons
  • – Handful of coriander, chopped
  • – 200g Sashimi grade tuna

Method:

  1. Cut the nori seaweed into halves, and then place half of the nori on the sushi mat shiny side down. As a golden rule, the shiny side of the nori seaweed should always be on the outside of the sushi.
  2. Place roughly 110g of sushi rice on the nori seaweed and spread across evenly. Flip the nori seaweed and sushi rice so that the nori seaweed is facing upward. Add a small portion of mayo, carrot, cucumber, tuna or any other filling in the centre.
  3. Start rolling from the bottom, tucking the edge of the roll to fully enclose the filling. Lift the edge of the mat and continue to roll forward until the sushi is formed into a firm cylinder.
  4. Slightly wet the blade of a sharp knife and slice the roll into 6 pieces. First, slice it into halves and then the halves into thirds. Clean the knife with a wet towel between cuts to prevent the rice from sticking to the knife. 
  5. Serve with soy sauce. Feel free to garnish with other foods such as sesame seeds, tobiko, chives, etc.

Glazed Pork

Ingredients – Serves 2:

  • – 1x pork fillet
  • – 2tbsp amazu-an sauce for glaze
  • – Vegetable oil for cooking

Method:

  1. Place all the ingredients into a bowl and massage together. Let marinade, ideally overnight. Remove from the fridge at least 30 minutes before cooking.
  2. Place a non-stick frying pan on high heat.
  3. Fry on both sides until golden, place aside to rest.
  4. Toss in amazu-an sauce to heat up.

Amazu-an Sauce

Ingredients – Serves 2:

  • – 1x shallot, diced
  • – 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • – 2cm of ginger, grated
  • – ¼ of pineapple, diced
  • – 1tsp of dark brown sugar
  • – 1tsp of rice vinegar
  • – 1x red chilli, chopped
  • – 2tbsp of Chopped Tomatoes or banana ketchup (or regular)
  • – 1tbs of tamari
  • – 1tbsp of sticky teriyaki
  • – Splash of water
  • – Vegetable oil for cooking
  • – Salt and pepper to taste

Garnish

  • – Chopped coriander
  • – Mixed sesame seeds to garnish

Method:

  1. Get a wok on high heat with a splash of oil, sauté the onion garlic & ginger until translucent. Add the remaining ingredients, apart from the garnish
  2. Bring to simmer and cook for 10 minutes on low heat until thickened.
  3. Serve with teriyaki pork and udon noodles.
  4. Garnish with sesame seeds and chopped coriander.

Stir-Fried Udon Noodles

Ingredients – Serves 2:

  • – 2x ready to wok udon noodles
  • – 1 red onion sliced
  • – 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • – 1 red pepper, sliced
  • – Handful of tender stem broccoli
  • – 3tbsp of soy sauce
  • – 1x lime, zest and juice
  • – Vegetable oil for frying
  • – Handful of mint
  • – Handful of coriander

Method:

  1. Place a wok on high heat with a splash of oil and sauté the onion until caramelised, followed by garlic. Sauté all the other vegetables until just softened.
  2. Splash in soy sauce and lime juice and place the noodles on top to heat up.
  3. Toss together and finish with chopped mint and coriander.

Temari is a less known variety of sushi overseas and is also not as common to find in Japan, although it’s a popular style of sushi to make at home given its simplicity in form. It’s made with a small round ball of pressed rice topped with a thin layer of fish or other ingredients, which is fitting since the name comes from the traditional Japanese embroidered ball, temari, meaning “hand ball.” Often colourful and decorative, it’s a popular food for parties and picnics, and is often made for the traditional girl’s day celebration known as Hinamatsuri. If making temari for a picnic, it’s best to used cured or cooked seafood rather than raw sashimi. 

Maki, also known as “norimaki,” refers to a type of sushi where rice and ingredients are carefully rolled in a sheet of nori seaweed, which is then cut into smaller pieces. It’s believed that makizushi came into existence in the early 1700s, soon after sheet nori was invented with a similar technique used for paper making. The name norimaki is made up of two Japanese words: “Maki” meaning to roll and “nori” referring to the toasted sheet of nori seaweed used to wrap the ingredients. This is the most common type of sushi nowadays (seaweed on the outside) ….Similar to Maki: Uramaki is a famous inside out sushi, using similar techniques as for making (California roll)

Gunkan maki is another type of maki—“rolled” or “wrapped” sushi—and was invented in a Ginza sushi restaurant in the 1940s. It’s made by wrapping a wide strip of nori around a rice ball while leaving enough space at the top to be filled with various ingredients. The name, translated as “battleship” or “warship” sushi, comes from its shape, resembling a tiny ship. Popular toppings for gunkan maki include uni sea urchin, squid, salmon roe, negitoro (a blend of fatty tuna belly and green onion), potato salad, and kanimiso (blended crab brains). Gunkan maki is commonly found both in takeout sushi bento boxes and at sushi restaurants

Temaki is a novel type of sushi with a shape resembling that of an ice cream cone. To make it, rice and ingredients are held within a sheet of nori wrapped into a conical shape. It’s popular at restaurants, as well as for making at home, given its simplicity. Temaki lends itself to a variety of fillings, with some popular types including umeshiso—a paste made of fresh shiso leaf and umeboshi (pickled plum), negitoro, squid with and without natto, and sweetened omelette.

Oshizushi (pressed sushi), also known as hakozushi (boxed sushi), is a strikingly shaped style of sushi originating in Osaka. This variety is made by pressing ingredients into an “oshiwaku” rectangular box, then layering it with toppings and cutting the sushi into neat angular shapes like rectangles, triangle, or small squares. The toppings include fish like mackerel or gizzard shad and may also be decoratively layered with edible leaves like bamboo. Toppings may be placed in different arrangements, such as diagonally or with a whole fish from end to end, and this unique display makes oshizushi a popular choice for bento boxes and gifts.

Chirashizushi, translated as “scattered sushi,” is a bowl of rice topped with a variety of ingredients, with popular toppings including pieces of salmon, squid, cucumber, shredded omelette, and boiled prawns. It’s similar to a kaisendon (Japanese rice bowl topped with a large amount of seafood), with the main difference being that chirashizushi uses vinegared sushi rice whereas kaisendon uses plain steamed white rice. You can easily find chirashizushi throughout Japan as it’s widely available in convenience stores, supermarkets and department store food courts. It’s often included as a bento box feature, or enjoyed as a stand-alone meal, given its wide variety of ingredients. Its decorative, bejewelled appearance makes it popular to serve at celebratory occasions.

Ingredients – Makes 1/4 Cup:

  • – 5 tbsp rice vinegar
  • – 5 tbsp of caster sugar
  • – 2 tbsp of sugar
  • – 100ml of filtered water

Method:

  1. Combine all ingredients in a small sauce pan and cook until the sugar has dissolved, and the liquid has reduced down by half.
  2. Cool down completely.

Method:

  1. Use good quality sushi rice. (we prefer nishiki or koshi: Yutaka brand)
  2. 1 sushi roll needs about 100g of uncooked rice.
  3. You can soak sushi rice before rinsing for 20 minutes for more tender grains.
  4. Rinse at least 3-4 times under running cold water, until it runs clear.
  5. Rice to water ratio: 250g of rice: 330g of water.
  6. Place in a pan, cold, medium heat, no lid at this point, waiting to start simmer.
  7. After bubbles appear, place the lid on your pan, turn the heat down and simmer for 11 minutes.
  8. Turn off the heat and let rest for 20 minutes, do not remove the lid.
  9. Add sushi seasoning, mix well and chill well in a refrigerator before using. (ideally overnight)

Ingredients – Makes 2 to 3 Rolls:

  • – 1.5 cup of sushi rice (we prefer nishiki or koshi: Yutaka brand)
  • – 2 cups of filtered water
  • – ¼ cup of sushi seasoning

Method:

  1. Place the rice and water into a rice cooker. Cook the rice according to the “white rice” setting on the rice cooker.
  2. When the rice has finished cooking, rest it for 10 minutes to absorb all the extra moisture. Evenly pour the sushi seasoning all over the rice. Toss the rice around to further distribute the rice vinegar, taking care to be gentle, and not mash the rice. Cool down properly, ideally refrigerate overnight.
  3. It is now ready to be used for sushi.

We Hope You Enjoyed The Class

If you have any feedback about the class or questions for chef please do get in touch. Email: lovetocook@foodsorcery.co.uk

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